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FAQs

1. How do I know if I need joint replacement?
2. What is a Joint Replacement Program?
3. What makes the Center for Joint Replacement so successful?
4. What types of surgery are offered at St. Mary Mercy?
5. What is a TKA and THA, and how is it performed?
6. What are the benefits of a TKA/THA?
7. How do I get more information?
8. How long is the recovery period?
9. How long will I be in the hospital?
10. How do I choose a Home Therapy group?
11. How much pain should I expect?
12. Why do I need a "coach"?
13. What do I need to consider when choosing my coach?
14. Where do I get the equipment I need?
15. Will I be able to use stairs in my house?
16. Does someone need to stay with me when I get home?

1. How do I know if I need joint replacement?
Click here to download and print our self-assessment quiz to find out!

2. What is a Joint Replacement Program?
The Center for Joint Replacement creates a positive environment to assist patients in returning to active pain free lives. The joint program emphasizes the well surgical patient and uses a group approach to promote teamwork and camaraderie.

3. What makes the Center for Joint Replacement so successful?
Our dedicated staff focuses on the well-surgical patient model, meaning patients who are not ill. We promote a positive attitude which helps in recovery. We also emphasize early mobilization, where improved outcomes are realized as a result. Our "graduates" are also great advocates - visit the Patient Testimonials web page for their stories.

4. What types of surgery are offered at St. Mary Mercy?
The Center for Joint Replacement offers Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) and Total Hip Arthroplasty (THA).

5. What is a TKA and THA, and how is it performed?
A TKA/THA is a surgical procedure in which damaged bones and cartilage are removed and replaced by an artificial joint. This is called prosthesis.

Hip: A natural ball and socket
In a hip joint - called "ball and socket" the head of the femur (thighbone) should fit into the socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis. Hip replacement consists of removing the damaged head of the femur and replacing it with a prosthesis. Next, the socket (acetabulum) is reshaped to fit a plastic liner, which holds the prosthesis and allows movement in the hip joint. These prosthetic components are anchored securely into your bone, which allows immediate movement and use of your new hip.

Knee: a hinge
In the knee - three bones form the connection to this joint: the femur (thighbone), the tibia (shinbone) and the patella (kneecap). In a knee joint replacement metal and plastic components replace the lower end of the femur and the top of the tibia. The patella is reshaped. The knee replacement is strictly a resurfacing or "retreading" procedure with components perfectly sized to restore you knee back to its original shape and alignment. Your normal ligaments and tendons are still holding your joint together and making it work.

6. What are the benefits of a TKA/THA?
Mobility is the cornerstone of independent living. When mobility is limited through injury or disease a person realizes how integral our joints are to daily living. A total knee or hip replacement allows one to return to independent living.

7. How do I get more information?
Please call 734-655-2400.

8. How long is the recovery period?
The recovery period for a joint replacement progresses quickly. Mobility is the key to recovery so physical therapy is initiated the day of surgery. Most people return to normal daily activities within 6-8 weeks.

9. How long will I be in the hospital?
Your length of stay is dependent upon your medical status, but the majority of patients are discharged after 1-3 days.

10. How do I choose a Home Therapy group?
It is a personal choice to determine your homecare. We can provide you with a list of agencies and make arrangements for your discharge.

11. How much pain should I expect?
Many improvements have been made in pain management. Often patients report they have less pain immediately following surgery than they did before.

12. Why do I need a "coach"?
A coach is necessary to support you in the hospital and in your recovery at home. They are the second pair of ears to assist you in recovery.

13. What do I need to consider when choosing my coach?
Your personal coach can be a family member, neighbor, friend, or anyone that will be able to offer encouragement in while you are in the hospital and once you transition home. We encourage your coach to come to the pre-surgical class and one group physical therapy session during your hospitalization.

14. Where do I get the equipment I need?
Arrangements are made while you are in the hospital to obtain necessary equipment.

15. Will I be able to use stairs in my house?
Physical therapy will ensure that you can successfully navigate stairs prior to your discharge home.

16. Does someone need to stay with me when I get home?
If you live alone, it helps to have someone available to check on you for the first few days after you return.

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St. Mary Mercy Livonia | 36475 Five Mile, Livonia, Michigan 48154 | 734-655-4800